The WHO recommends treating vapes like traditional cigarettes.

The World Health Organization has urged countries to treat vapes as traditional cigarettes and ban all flavors. Teen e-cigarette use may lead to addiction to smoke tar, damage the lungs, and increase the risk of heart and lung disease. As of July this year, 34 countries have banned the use of vapes, but many countries are without regulation. Some countries, such as Australia, China, the European Union, and Japan, have introduced laws restricting the use and sale of vapes.

According to Bisnis. The World Health Organization reported on 28 December. The World Health Organization (WHO) has urged countries to treat vapes as they do traditional cigarettes, banning all flavors.

 

According to the WHO, about one in five American adults, or 11 million people, are using e-cigarettes. A growing body of data suggests that the harmful substances produced by e-cigarettes can damage the lungs and increase the risk of heart and lung disease.

 

To protect citizens, especially children and adolescents, WHO urges countries to take strict measures to avoid the spread of e-cigarettes. Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus has warned that young people who use e-cigarettes may have become addicted to e-cigarettes and tobacco tar in childhood.

 

As of July this year, 34 countries, including Brazil, India, Iran, and Thailand, have banned the use of vapes. The 74 countries, including Pakistan, Colombia, and Mongolia, are mostly in Africa and have yet to control vapes by any means. In some major markets, such as the United States and China, e-cigarettes are permitted by the government, but there are corresponding regulations on their use.